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OPEN IN CASE OF RAIN: SEVERAL INDOOR ACTIVITIES!

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ABOUT

HISTORY

In 2017, the idea of a major event in the heart of Quebec City as part of the festivities surrounding the 150th anniversary of Confederation was born. The Huron-Wendat Nation Council and the Assembly of First Nations Quebec-Labrador, which represents all the Nations in Quebec and is the voice of these Nations and their communities, took on the task of organizing a major cultural event with the 11 Indigenous Nations of Quebec, in Quebec City.

During the pre-pandemic editions, the 30,000 visitors were able to enjoy an original and contemporary program that respected the authenticity of the indigenous peoples of Quebec. In 2021, KWE adapted its program with a hybrid edition. Visitors had access to a range of activities, video clips of skills and musical performances online and broadcast to enjoy KWE! as if they were there.

OUR GOALS

1

To promote the spread and recognition of Indigenous people and Inuit cultures in Quebec through the organization and production of various public activities.

2

To organize and promote public events (non-monetary) to celebrate Indigenous Peoples and Inuit cultures, traditions and contemporary life.

3

Promote the knowledge, issues, and traditional wisdom that affect Indigenous peoples.

4

Sensitize the public and the organizations to the needs and realities of Indigenous Peoples and Inuit.

5

To showcase the artistic talents of Indigenous Peoples and Inuit.

6

To create and produce First Nations and Inuit shows and artistic performances in Quebec in a professional manner.

OUR VALUES

A

Authenticity

Authenticity in the representation of Indigenous Peoples' talents, traditions and realities in Quebec.

E

Equality and inclusion

Ensuring that all 11 Nations in Quebec are equitably represented in all program activities.

M

First Nations and Inuit Management

Commitment and involvement of our First Nations and Inuit resources.

S

Share

Bringing together the talents, traditions and realities of First Nations and Inuit to the general public.

11 NATIONS AUTOCHTONES DU QUÉBEC

Wolastoqiyik

(Malécites)

The great Wolastoqiyik Nation includes eight (8) communities: one in Maine, six in New Brunswick and one in Quebec. The Wolastoqiyik Wahsipekuk is the community living in Cacouna, along the south shore of the St. Lawrence River. This Nation has always been known for the quality of its handicrafts, sculpture, ornaments made from porcupine quills, beadwork and basket-making. [...]

Anishinabe

In western Quebec, the Anishinabeg have stayed very close to their ancestral roots and lifestyle. Most still use their Algonquian mother tongue, in which their name means "real people." [...]

Atikamekw

Committed to a lifestyle and economic development that respects traditions and the environment, the Atikamekw are masters of bark work, canoe-making, and of making blueberry gummies and maple syrup! Their name means "white fish." [...]

Eeyou

(Cri)

The Cree, the third most populous Nation in Quebec, is a large community that, with the Inuit, were at the center of the 1975 negotiations with the federal and provincial governments regarding hydroelectric projects in the region. [...]

Innu

Called "Mountaineers" by early French explorers, due to their home among the small mountains of the Côte-Nord region, Innu is the most populous Nation in Quebec. In Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (Pekuakami), they are known as the llnus. [...]

Inuit

In the Inuktitut language, the word "Inuit" (the people) hearkens back to a time when the inhabitants of the Arctic thought they were the only people on Earth. The Inuit of Quebec inhabit 14 villages across the immensity of the far north. Their lifestyle and their art - sculpting in particular - are world-renowned. [...]

Kanien'kehá:ka

(Mohawk)

The once-powerful Kanien'kehá:ka (Mohawk) Nation, member of the League of Five Nations, remains strongly attached to traditions and rituals. The Kanien'kehá:ka (Mohawk), the second-most populous Nation in Quebec, have been able to preserve their values and self-determination, despite the influence of neighboring towns. [...]

M’igmaq

In the 16th century, the Mi'gmag met the first Europeans on the coast of the Gaspé Peninsula. Help from these fishers and navigators proved crucial for explorers and merchants. The Mi'gmaq share their history and strong identity through various locations and activities, such as salmon fishing. Music is at the heart of Mi'gmaq rituals, feasts, and cultural ceremonies. [...]

Naskapi

Members of the Naskapi Nation have a deep knowledge of a vast boreal area. The Naskapi continue to apply their traditional know-how to hunting, fishing and tourist expeditions on the tundra and taiga. Caribou are a major theme in their craftsmanship. [...]

W8banaki

The W8banaki Nation's name is derived from the words Waban and aki, meaning "land of the rising sun." Located in Odanak and Wolinak, the Abenaki people originated in southern Quebec and in the modern-day states of Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire. [...]

Wendat

In Wendake, near Quebec City, you will find the only Huron-Wendat community in Canada, located near their former village of Stadacona. High-quality infrastructures have allowed the community to promote its heritage and develop the cultural tourism sector. [...]

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HONORARY PRESIDENT

Since our debut in 2017, Dr. Stanley Vollant, a well-known Innu surgeon (community of Pessamit), agrees to support us as the official spokesperson of the event. 

Through his involvement and reputation, Dr. Vollant gives credibility to the event and increases the visitor's commitment to Kwe, as shown by his participation in the Puamun Meshkenu walk "The Path of a Thousand Dreams" which encourages the public to come and walk in great numbers from year to year.

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